The Reversible Herringbone Scarf – A Small Knitting Dream Come True!

Reversible Herringbone Scarf

Reversible Herringbone Scarf

Knitting has been a part of my life for a very long time – over 45 years.  For a long while now, I’ve wished I could publish some of my own original knitting patterns.  Well, that dream has come true!  My very first published knitting pattern – the Reversible Herringbone Scarf is available to download on the top right of this blog.   If you click on the small picture on the top right or the larger picture in this post a PDF document of the pattern will open in a new window.

This pattern was submitted to Ravelry and I’ve been accepted as a designer there!  It isl so exciting that after all these years this small knitting dream is coming true!

If you are a knitter, you’ve probably heard of Ravelry.  If you haven’t, it is a wonderful on-line community for knitters, crochet people, spinners and even weavers.   If you like any kind of fiber arts and don’t belong to Ravelry – JOIN – it’s free!   My user name is: Sammie

This is a very versatile scarf pattern – it can be made in many widths and is a suitable pattern stitch for men, women or children.  It can be made in any weight of yarn as well.  The most important thing, to me, in a scarf pattern – is for the scarf to look good on both sides – this scarf looks the same on both sides.  Also, it is super simple to knit – the instructions are very detailed without lots of abbreviations.  It works best in a plain color so the stitch pattern is visible and a soft yarn which would feel nice around your neck.

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Lemon Poppyseed Shortbread

Recently, I purchased two Nordicware Shortbread pans.  They are very nice heavy pans made of cast aluminum.  For some strange reason, I have this “thing”  (not enough of a “thing” to really be a fetish) for pans and kitchen equipment – I love to get kitchen stuff and then end up not using a lot of it.

Shortbread Pans

Shortbread Pans

So, I decided to make some Lemon Poppyseed Shortbread to try out the new pans – before they just became some more dust collecting clutter in my kitchen.

Pressing Shortbread Dough In Pans

Pressing Shortbread Dough In Pans

This is the recipe I  used:

Lemon Poppyseed Shortbread

1 Pound of Butter – Softened (Two Sticks – be sure to use Real Butter NOT margarine)

1 Cup of Powdered Sugar (Sometimes called Confectioner’s or Icing Sugar)

2 Cups of Flour

2 Heaping Tablespoons Freshly Grated Lemon Rind or Zest (You can use even more if you’d like)

2 Tablespoons Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice

1 Heaping Tablespoon Poppy Seeds

(One large lemon should be enough – grate the skin and then squeeze it)

Microplane Grater/Zester

Microplane Grater/Zester

In preparation, grate the zest (skin) on the lemon, I love to use my Microplane Grater/Zester for this – it makes short work of making mountains of lemon zest!  After grating the skin cut the lemon in half and squeeze out the juice.

Cream the butter and powdered sugar together in a large bowl.  Add the lemon zest and juice and the poppyseeds.  Start mixing in the flour a bit at a time.  I usually just use my hands to knead the flour in.  Keep kneading until you get a nice smooth dough.

Press the dough evenly into the shortbread pan – or, into a 9 inch square or round cake pan or pie pan.  If you aren’t using a shortbread pan, you can sprinkle some granulated or coarse sugar on the top before baking.

Put into a preheated 300 degrees F oven and bake for 30 to 35 minutes until slightly browned around the edges.

Out of the Oven

Out of the Oven

If using shortbread pans let the pans cool 5 minutes or so before removing the shortbread.  To remove, put a cutting board over the pan – hold the cutting board and pan together and turn them upside down quickly. Set them down on the counter and lift the pan off the shortbread – it should come right off. Shortbread has so much butter that is never sticks.  Cut along the lines left from the pan with a sharp knife while still warm – it will crumble if you wait till it is totally cool to cut it.  If you are using 9 inch square or round pan – let the pan cool a few minutes than cut the shortbread into pieces with a sharp knife, then when the shortbread is cool recut along the same lines and remove from the pan.  It will crumble if you wait until it is completely cool to cut it.  Round pans look nice cut into wedges.

Shortbread from Snowflake Pan

Shortbread from Snowflake Pan

Shortbread from darker Pan

Shortbread from darker Pan

As you can see from the pictures – I made a double recipe.  This Lemon Poppyseed Shortbread is really good – it is tender and has a wonderful lemon flavor with that nutty taste of poppy seeds!  It stores well in a tin or plastic container with a lid that seals tightly. Put some parchment or wax paper in the container before storing the shortbread – plain white paper towel works, too. 

Lemon Poppyseed Shortbread

Lemon Poppyseed Shortbread

Enjoy your Lemon Poppyseed Shortbread!

This recipe shouldn’t need any adjustment for altitude.  I live and bake at a high altitude (7,605 feet) and it turned out perfectly.  Since shortbread has no levening – baking it at a lower altitude shouldn’t make much difference.  The baking time might be less at a lower altitude.  It took 35 minutes to bake this.

Farmer’s Market

Well, it’s been ages since I’ve blogged.  It’s hard to say why, I often think about it but then never get around to actually doing it – kind of the story of my life.  Actually, I have been busy but not so busy that I couldn’t do a blog post once in awhile.  Hopefully, this post will prime the blogging pump.

Damp Farmer's Market

Damp Farmer's Market

Ana - She Knit the Sweater She's Wearing!

Ana - She Knit the Sweater She's Wearing!

Anyway, my husband came home from work a bit early today so we could go to the La Jara Farmer’s Market, it is on Friday afternoons and starts at 3pm and ends around 6 or 7 pm or when it starts to rain – as it usually seems to do on Friday afternoons just because of the Market (it seems that way).  It had been a damp sort of day and there weren’t a lot of vendors.  However, there was some very nice looking produce at very good prices – I got some squash and some nectarines.  We saw quite a few people we know and had fun talking with them.  There were lots of interesting people from old farmers to Amish folks.  My knitting friend, Ana, was there – she had a booth and was selling some of her hand knit items.  There was a very good guitar player, too – a bit loud, but very good. 

Yellow Carrots

Yellow Carrots

Fresh Onions

Fresh Onions

 
Since I am NOT a morning person, I really like the La Jara Farmer’s Market being on Friday afternoons instead of on Saturday morning like most Farmer’s Markets.  Otherwise, I might miss seeing interesting people like these!
Melon Seller

Melon Seller

  

Checking Peaches

Checking Peaches

It was drizzling while we were walking around the market.  Shortly after we left and returned home, it started raining quite hard.